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Friday, June 14, 2024

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SCOTUS begins issuing new opinions, with another expected related to the power of federal agencies, the battleground state of Wisconsin gets a ruling on alternative voting sites, and coastal work is being done to help salt marshes withstand hurricanes.

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The Supreme Court for now protects access to abortion drug mifepristone, while Senate Republicans block a bill protecting access to in-vitro fertilization. Wisconsin's Supreme Court bans mobile voting sites, and colleges deal with funding cuts as legislatures target diversity programs.

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As summer nears, America's newest and largest international dark sky sanctuary beckons, rural job growth is up, but full recovery remains elusive, rural Americans living in prison towns support a transition, while birth control is more readily available in rural areas.

Water

The wells providing water on Santee Tribal lands had manganese levels more than 50 times greater than what is considered safe for adults. Excessively high manganese can cause problems with memory, attention and motor skills. (Adobe Stock)

Friday, June 14, 2024

NE Santee Sioux Tribe hopeful after years of unusable tap water

Members of the Nebraska Santee Sioux Tribe hope a solution to their five-year water ordeal may be on the way. Their tap water has been unusable for …

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Port Westward is located on the Columbia River north of the town of Clatskanie, Ore. (Sam Beebe/Wikimedia Commons)

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Groups challenge proposed refinery near Columbia River

A lawsuit is challenging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decision not to require a permit for the construction of a new refinery on the Columbia …

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On Oct. 5, 1966, Fermi 1 suffered a partial fuel meltdown. Two of the 92 fuel assemblies were partially damaged. According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, no abnormal radioactivity was released into the environment. (spiritofamerica/Adobe Stock)

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Climate change reignites concerns over nuclear storage on MI shores

Summer temperatures are one more reason for concern by environmental groups about the nuclear waste stored along the Great Lakes. There are three …

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South Dakota loses up to 100,000 acres of grasslands annually, according to the South Dakota Grassland Coalition. Grassland bird species are declining faster than any other group on the continent. (Gregory Johnston/Adobe Stock)

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Support grows for threatened SD grasslands

About 1.6 million acres of Great Plains grasslands were destroyed in 2021 alone, according to a recent report, an area the size of Delaware. One …

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Clapper rails find food, shelter and a place to raise their young in the highly productive South Carolina salt marsh habitat. (South Carolina Department of Natural Resources)
Salt Marsh Initiative aims to protect SC lowcountry from storm surges

With hurricane season underway, South Carolina's 344,000 acres of salt marshes are the first line of defense for the state's lowcountry against storm …

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Two South Dakota drought resiliency projects will supply about 130 homes with high-quality drinking water. (Adobe Stock)
New federal funds earmarked for SD rural water projects

Some rural South Dakotans struggle to get good drinking water but the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has awarded two local communities with grants to …

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LNG is created when gas is cooled into a liquid that can be stored and shipped to destinations around the world. (Mike Mareen/Adobe Stock)
Decreased demand for liquefied natural gas could impact TX economy

Workers in the oil and gas industry are warily monitoring the supply and demand of liquefied natural gas, or LNG. Texas is one of the largest …

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The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has proposed issuing water withdrawal permits, which would allow several local water utilities to increase the amount of water they pull from the Duck River by about 16 million gallons daily. (RobertMiller/Adobe Stock)<br />
Middle TN's Duck River on list of 'nation's most endangered' waterways

The Duck River, which flows through seven Middle Tennessee counties, has made a national list of "most endangered" rivers. The group American Rivers …

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The Washington County Water Conservancy District's Quail Creek water treatment plant is currently capable of treating 60 million gallons of water per day. (Adobe Stock)
One UT county receives federal funds for water reuse project

As water scarcity affects states across the West, a Utah community is getting funds from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to help support its water …

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If dairies in Willcox continue to grow, annual water use is projected to increase from an estimated 2,953 acre-feet to 5,085 acre-feet by 2038, according to the Arizona Department of Water Resources. (Adobe Stock)
AZ town grapples with drying wells, unregulated water use, large ag ops

Wells in the Willcox Basin in southeastern Arizona are drying up, and many are pointing the finger at massive agriculture and cattle operations…

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The white-nosed coatimundi, classified as an endangered species in New Mexico, roams and hunts during daytime hours in the Gila Wilderness. (National Park Service)
New Mexico celebrates 100 years of Gila Wilderness preservation

New Mexico's Gila Wilderness is special - not only for its natural beauty, but also because it received the world's first-ever "wilderness" …

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The five states included in the Gulf Coast Resilience Network are Texas, Florida, Mississippi, Tennessee and Louisiana. (Rawpixel.com/Adobe Stock)
Child care centers along the TX coast prep for hurricane season

The advocacy group Save the Children is working with child care providers along the Texas coast ahead of the upcoming hurricane season. The …

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